Several downtown streets could have ‘reduced water pressure’ for next 3 months

water pressure
Photo by Ferdinand Stöhr on Unsplash

Due to an emergency watermain repair taking place in downtown Toronto, several neighbourhoods, streets, and buildings could experience lower water pressure between January 22 and April 30.

According to the City, a watermain was damaged by a private contractor on January 20 near Gerrard Street and Yonge Street.

While water service in its entirety will not be interrupted in the area, lower water pressure could be experienced in the following — rather vaguely outlined — areas:

  • College/Carlton Street to the north
  • Dundas Street to the south
  • Sherbourne Street to the east
  • Spadina Avenue to the west

Repairs will take place underground, so no disruption to traffic is anticipated.

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Safe drinking water will be supplied throughout the watermain repair by rerouting water through surrounding watermains, according to a release from the City. That said, due to the directional change of water flow necessary to accomplish the rerouting, iron deposits can be disrupted, causing a discolouration of the water. The City also assures residents that there are no health-related impacts associated with the discolouration and the water is safe to drink.

According to the City:

Those in buildings less than four storeys that experience discoloured water should flush the taps by running the water until it is clear – up to 30 minutes. Those in taller multi-residential buildings should contact their property manager. If the discolouration continues after flushing, contact 311. Minimal water pressure (40 psi or greater) will be maintained throughout repair work.

So, to sum up, if you live in this area, here’s what your next three months look like:

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